Adventure Trend

» Your Mileage May Vary

Chris Townsend » Dealing with the challenges of long-distance walking

Chris Townsend at the finish of the Pacific Northwest Trail

Chris Townsend at the finish of the Pacific Northwest Trail

Chris Townsend »

  • Sleeping well is very important for morale and your physical condition. If you’re not sleeping well because your mat is too hard or your sleeping bag too cold or too hot make changes when you can, even if it means buying new gear. Don’t suffer unnecessarily.
  • Take care of your feet. Blisters and sore feet are probably the main cause of unhappiness and distress for long-distance walkers and the main reason people give up. Having good, properly fitting footwear at the start is of course important. However, days and weeks of constant use can change footwear internally. If you start getting blisters or your feet start to ache badly think of changing your footwear. I like to have two pairs – trail shoes and sandals – with me and sometimes swap them over during the day. If you don’t want to carry a second pair you can have one sent ahead in supply boxes. If blisters and hot spots do occur treat them straight away. Ignoring them only makes them worse and longer lasting.
  • The length of a walk can seem daunting if you view it as a whole. A finish that is hundreds or thousands of miles away can seem an impossible goal, especially when just reaching the next camp site feels like a challenge. To overcome this feeling break the walk into sections and just think about the next stage. All long walks have resupply points. These can be used as the start and end points so that the walk becomes a series of shorter walks.

More at Chris Townsend Outdoors »

Emil and Liliana Schmid are featured on Autoevolution

Liliana Schmid and a their Toyota Land Cruiser FJ60 in Ushuaia

Liliana Schmid and a their 1982 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ60 in Ushuaia, Argentina

World record holders Emil and Liliana Schmid have been driving their 1982 Toyota Land Cruiser FJ60 around the world since 1984.

Elena Gorgan writing in Autoevolution »

As of 2017, they still hold the Guinness record for the longest driven journey in the world: 741,065 km (460,476 miles) across 186 countries. But they also hold records for the most miles done in a single car and the most countries visited in a single car.

More importantly, they have no plans of stopping. The Land Cruiser went through its third rejuvenation in March 2017 and, as you would imagine, hundreds of flat tires, dozens of shock absorbers and batteries, one engine mounting, and too many to count cosmetic scratches and dents. Emil hopes it will continue running until they decide – or have to – stop traveling.

Not that they’re planning to do so anytime soon. “Life is not measured by the number of breaths we take, but by the places that take your breath away,” Liliana once mused. “It’s little things that make it worthwhile – it’s a flower, it’s a bird, it’s a mountain.”

More »

Six months ago, 56-year old Su Min left her unhappy marriage and has been exploring China ever since, sleeping in a rooftop tent atop her Volkswagen Polo hatchback

Min says she’s the happiest she’s been in many years.

Alex Myall, writing in Exploreweb »

She saved her $300 monthly pension and combined it with her savings to buy a white Volkswagen Polo hatchback. She researched everything she could about traveling on a budget — which apps are most helpful on the road, tips to save money — and when the twins started school, she fixed a rooftop tent to her car and hit the road.

Leaving Zhengzhou last September, she has covered more than 13,000km and has visited some of China’s most famous sites — historical Xi’an, mountainous Sichuan, the old town of Lijiang — and is currently on her way to Guilin, famous for its lumpy karst hills and cormorant fishermen. She’s been traveling for more than six months.

Her husband, who ridiculed her decision, has not seen her since she left, and while Su shudders at the thought of their eventual reunion, she is relishing her freedom.

More »

 

Google Maps tips for adventurers

Google has published tips on how adventurers might better use Google Maps »

Do you have the urge to take every fork in the road and leave no trail untraveled? On the road to adventure, Google Maps can help guide the way — no matter where you’re going.

  •  Be prepared for all conditions: There’s nothing like a surprise rain storm to dampen adventure. Use the new weather and air quality layers to your advantage. See current weather conditions and temperatures, or check the air quality better plan your fresh-air outings.
  • Don’t miss your train or plane with Indoor Live View: Airports and train stations can feel like a maze. Starting this summer in Zurich and Tokyo, use AR cues to see where the nearest platform, gates, elevator and escalators are, as well as baggage claim, restrooms, and ATMs.
  • Pedal to your next adventure: Planning a hill climb or beach cruise ride? Check how flat or steep a route will be with biking directions. And if you don’t have a two-wheel companion, you can access bike-sharing stations in more than 100 cities thanks to integrations with CitiBike, Lyft and Lime integrations.
  • Tabs are your new tick list :Use the tabs at the bottom of the app to keep track of your travel bucket list and find your next must-see destination! Check out the Updates tab to see trending, must-see spots from local experts and publishers — so you can find the best things to do no matter where you are.
  • Remember where you’ve been: From the new trailhead you found to the hidden campground you want to revisit, we love to use Saved Places to view all these spots in one place. It’s perfect for reminiscing and sharing recommendations with friends.

More »

Video » Overcoming a life changing illness through wild swimming

Laura Owen Sanderson is a cold water swimmer in the U.K. After a life changing medical event she decided to reroute her life and to ‘live with purpose’ and founded We Swim Wild, to help “protect wild waters through adventure, education, campaigning, and scientific research.”

Laura Owen Sanderson »

I wasn’t afraid to die. I was more afraid, or angry if you’d like, that I hadn’t lived, that I hadn’t made the most of every opportunity. So I was waiting for a day that might never come — when you retire or when you’re thin enough or when the kids have grown up — and there was a sudden realisation that that day might never come.

via Vimeo »

Hydrotherapy is a story of adaptation, strength & rewilding set in the raw and beautiful landscapes of Snowdonia National park. Laura has not only overcome a life changing illness through wild swimming, but has also found a greater connection to the natural world. This has ignited her mission to make a stand for the natural environment, and protect wild waters and wild spaces across the UK.

Krystal Kelly is travelling the world on horseback

Euronews Travel’s video series, Women Beyond Borders, brings us first-person stories of women around the world who are living brave, adventurous lives, and conquering their own personal challenges on the road.

via YouTube »

Since she was a young child, Krystal Kelly – or the Equestrian Adventuress – has had two great passions: horses and travel. She has since dedicated her life to both, working with horses in over 20 countries, and travelling to over 60.

During her travels, she has set up the first ever horse riding program in Bhutan, as well as being one of just 22 riders to complete the Mongolian Derby in the year that she entered. No mean feat, as the Derby is a gruelling 1000km,10-day ride, which offers some of the best horseback views in the world.

Video » Dangerous roads of Tajikistan

via YouTube »

The land locked nation of Tajikistan is the poorest country in central Asia. The mountainous landscape is unforgiving and temperatures extreme. Here desperate truck drivers can wait for days to get assigned a load to transport across the treacherous terrain.

Working in old and battered trucks on bone-shaking routes, dodging falling rocks and landslides, and being forced to wake up every two hours during the night to start their engines so they don’t freeze up and leave them stranded; these men are severely tested.

They do it all for the love of their families who wait for weeks at a time, hoping that their husbands and fathers will return safe. A look at both sides of the lives of Tajik long distance drivers.

Video » Leh-Manali Highway in India » One of the world’s most dangerous roads

2010 documentary.

via YouTube »

It is a road of mountain passes and India’s access to the roof of the world – the Himalayas. This 475-kilometre long route at the northernmost tip of the Indian subcontinent connects the cities of Manali and Leh at the heart of the Ladakh region.

The term “highway” applies quite literally, since the route traverses five of the highest drivable mountain passes in the world – among these the Lohtang La at 3,978 metres above sea level, the Lachulung La at 5,059 metres and the Tanglang La at 5,325 metres.

Crossing these passes is a challenge for both vehicle and man. The mountain peaks, still snow-capped even in the depths of summer, wide variety of vegetation and the fantastic and craggy landscape turn any journey into a captivating adventure.

 

« Older posts

© 2021 Adventure Trend

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑