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Category: Earth (Page 1 of 21)

Obesity among New Zealand children is continuing to decline, according to a University of Otago study

Researcher Dr Lisa Daniels says »

“What is really reassuring to see from this work is that the declines in high BMI (body mass index) over time are occurring overall and across sociodemographic indicators – sex, ethnicity, deprivation and urban/rural classification – suggesting a narrowing of inequities,” she says.

“Importantly, we observed a narrowing in socioeconomic disparities, showing more pronounced decreases in prevalence above each of the BMI thresholds for children residing in the most deprived areas compared with those living in the least deprived areas.”

“Others have suggested that contributions towards declines in overweight and obesity in preschool children could include efforts to focus on public health interventions and initiatives, increased parental education, decreasing unemployment rates, decreased maternal smoking during pregnancy, increased breastfeeding problems and an increasing proportion of mothers born overseas where lower population BMIs are present.” »

Oly Rush completes 37-hour non-stop swim round Grand Cayman island

At this point in my life, I don’t know that I could possibly stay awake for a full 37 hours without taking regular naps on the chesterfield.

BBC »

An eco campaigner, who has raised thousands of pounds for charity, is thought to be the first person to swim round a Caribbean island non-stop.

Oly Rush, 37, completed the 95.5km (59.3 mile) swim around Grand Cayman in 36 hours and 59 minutes.

Mr Rush, from Upton, Dorset, said the “absolutely brutal” challenge was “the hardest thing” he has completed. »

Congratulations Oly!

U.S. road deaths surged to 42,915 lives lost in 2021 » Highest since 2005

Yet, the surprise isn’t the increase, but by the amount » 10.5 percent, the biggest year-over-year jump, ever.

The number of people dying on America’s roads is increasing. The US had 38,842 deaths in 2020, which is 7.2 percent higher than 2019 despite the numerous lockdowns related to the COVID pandemic.

While the U.S. death toll continues to surge, traffic fatalities in other developed countries continues falling.

Vice »

Earlier this week, the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) released the latest road fatality statistics. It is “grim reading,” the latter being a phrase that regularly appears in news articles about American road death statistics for the past half-century. 42,915 people died while trying to get where they needed to go on U.S. roads last year. That’s 117 people on average each day, or about the number of people you can stuff into a large regional jet. One plane going down every day for an entire year.

Elsewhere » The Detroit Bureau / Transportation Today / Ars Technica / Axios

Could Almere provide a glimpse of what living in cities will be like in the future?

BBC »

Almere’s evolution is inspiring other cities too, by providing examples of innovative urban planning in action. “Professionals – politicians, architects, city planners – come from all over the world to look and learn from Almere,” says JaapJan Berg, citing particular interest from China. “They have been working on new towns and cities there on a completely different scale – places like Shenzhen. In the UK, I would mention Milton Keynes, and in France, Marne-la-Vallee.”

MVRDV, meanwhile, have drawn on principles from Almere in their ongoing redevelopment of the city centre of the Dutch city of Eindhoven, which aims at allow that city to expand significantly, yet still retain an air of “cosiness”. Cues from Almere include creating green city centre living spaces and using brightly-coloured buildings in striking shapes to enliven the feel of the cityscape.

Principles learned in Almere are also being deployed on a smaller scale in the little Dutch village of Overschild, which saw almost 80% of its homes badly damaged as a result of earthquakes triggered by fracking in the area.

Key ideas trialled in Almere that are being introduced here include the chance for residents to design their own new homes, alongside collective decision making on infrastructure and facilities. “Residents were asked what their wishes were and how they felt the village should look like in 10 years – [then] we have given the residents a toolbox which will give them the help and inspiration needed to take the future into their own hands,” says Winy Maas. »

California nearly 100% powered by renewables for first time

Desert Sun »

Renewable electricity provided just shy of 100% of California’s electricity demand on Saturday, a record-breaker, officials said, much of it from large amounts of solar power now produced along Interstate 10, an hour east of the Coachella Valley.

Environmentalists over the weekend celebrated as an official online supply tracker surged to 101%, but a power official said late Monday that they had doublechecked the data, and adjusted it slightly due to battery charging and reserves and other resource needs.

While partygoers celebrated in the blazing sunshine at the Stagecoach music festival, energy demand statewide hit 18,672 megawatts at 2:45 p.m., “and at 2:50, we reached 99.87% of load served by all renewables, which broke the previous record … of 97.58%,” said Anna Gonzales, spokeswoman for California Independent System Operator, or CAISO, a nonprofit that oversees the state’s bulk electric power system and transmission lines.

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