Curious about Everything

Category: China (Page 1 of 2)

Alphabet / Google CEO Sundar Pichai calls for international government regulations on cybersecurity, AI, innovation

Tripp Mickle, Wall Street Journal »

Sundar Pichai, chief executive of Google and parent company Alphabet Inc., said the U.S. government should take a more active role in policing cyberattacks and encouraging innovation with policies and investments.

In the wake of recent cybersecurity breaches attributed to Chinese and Russian hackers, Mr. Pichai said the time had come to draft the equivalent of a Geneva Convention for technology to outline international legal standards for an increasingly connected world.

“Governments on a multilateral basis…need to put it up higher on the agenda,” Mr. Pichai said in a recorded interview for The Wall Street Journal’s Tech Live conference on Monday. “If not, you’re going to see more of it because countries would resort to those things.”

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Also » CNET / TechCrunch

Documentary » China is “the most ambitious Orwellian project in human history”

China has the world’s largest digital surveillance system. The state collects massive amounts of data from citizens in an effort to control behaviour. Critics call it “the most ambitious Orwellian project in human history.”

In the so-called “brain” of Shanghai, for example, authorities have an eye on everything. On huge screens, they can switch to any of the approximately one million cameras, to find out who’s falling asleep behind the wheel, or littering, or not following Coronavirus regulations. “We want people to feel good here, to feel that the city is very safe,” says Sheng Dandan, who helped design the “brain.” Surveys suggest that most Chinese are inclined to see benefits as opposed to risks: if algorithms can identify every citizen by their face, speech and even the way they walk, those breaking the law or behaving badly will have no chance. It’s incredibly convenient: a smartphone can be used to accomplish just about any task, and playing by the rules leads to online discounts thanks to a social rating system.

Ten warships belonging to China and Russia passed jointly through a narrow strait in northern of Japan

The saber rattling happening in the Tsugaru Strait which lies between Japan’s main island of Honshu and the northern island of Hokkaido. This is the first time that Chinese and Russian warships are known to have passed the strait together.

 

Nikkei »

The warships sailed eastward toward the Pacific Ocean, likely as part of “Naval Interaction 2021,” a joint maritime exercise the two navies are conducting this month.

The narrowest point of the Tsugaru Strait is 19.5 km, or 12.1 miles, but the center part of the strait is designated as international waters — a Cold War relic that let American vessels carrying nuclear weapons pass through.

The group consisted of five Chinese vessels — one Renhai class destroyer, one Luyang-III class destroyer, two Jiangkai class frigates and one Fuchi class replenishment oiler — and five Russian vessels, which were two Udaloy class destroyers, two Steregushchiy class frigates and one Marshal Nedelin class missile-tracking ship.

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It has never ended well for those who betray the motherland » Is Taiwan next on China’s list?

DW’s TO THE POINT ask: Dangerous territory: Is Taiwan next on China’s list?

Guests:
Deutsche Welle colleague Melissa Chan, who presents DW’s News Asia show. She says: “Xi Jinping has gone after China’s Uyghur minority, then Hong Kong, and even its tech billionaires. So, why wouldn’t he go after Taiwan?”

Gudrun Wacker, an Asia expert from the German Institute for International and Security Affairs, who believes that: “China’s saber-rattling is a message to Taiwan that the balance of power between the two sides makes unification inevitable and resistance pointless.”

Felix Lee, from the Berlin-based daily the TAZ, or Tageszeitung, spent many years as a correspondent in Beijing. And Felix asks: “Will China go for the military option? That depends on the US and its allies. Certainly, Xi Jinping will not risk a full-blown conflict with the West.”

Wang Huning is arguably the single most influential “public intellectual” today

N. S. Lyons, Palladium Magazine »

One day in August 2021, Zhao Wei disappeared. For one of China’s best-known actresses to physically vanish from public view would have been enough to cause a stir on its own. But Zhao’s disappearing act was far more thorough: overnight, she was erased from the internet. Her Weibo social media page, with its 86 million followers, went offline, as did fan sites dedicated to her. Searches for her many films and television shows returned no results on streaming sites. Zhao’s name was scrubbed from the credits of projects she had appeared in or directed, replaced with a blank space. Online discussions uttering her name were censored. Suddenly, little trace remained that the 45-year-old celebrity had ever existed.

She wasn’t alone.

Wang Huning much prefers the shadows to the limelight. An insomniac and workaholic, former friends and colleagues describe the bespectacled, soft-spoken political theorist as introverted and obsessively discreet. It took former Chinese leader Jiang Zemin’s repeated entreaties to convince the brilliant then-young academic—who spoke wistfully of following the traditional path of a Confucian scholar, aloof from politics—to give up academia in the early 1990s and join the Chinese Communist Party regime instead. When he finally did so, Wang cut off nearly all contact with his former connections, stopped publishing and speaking publicly, and implemented a strict policy of never speaking to foreigners at all. Behind this veil of carefully cultivated opacity, it’s unsurprising that so few people in the West know of Wang, let alone know him personally.

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Taiwan slams largest-ever incursion by Chinese into air defence zone (Updated to add video)

A KJ-500 is one of the Chinese military jets that flew into Taiwan’s air defense identification zone.

Taiwan has reported the largest ever incursion by the Chinese air force into its air defense zone, with Beijing sending 38 aircraft into the island’s airspace.

The Guardian »

Taipei says Chinese jets and bombers crossed zone as Beijing marked the anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic

A record 38 Chinese military jets crossed into Taiwan’s defence zone as Beijing marked the founding of the People’s Republic of China, officials in Taipei have said.

The show of force on China’s national day on Friday near the self-ruled democratic island, which Beijing claims as part of its territory, came in the same week it accused Britain of sending a warship into the Taiwan strait with “evil intentions”.

France 24 »

Taiwan sharply criticised China on Saturday after Beijing marked the founding of the People’s Republic of China with the largest ever incursion by the Chinese air force into the island’s air defence zone.

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Meng Wanzhou is free to leave Canada

Statement from the Department of Justice Canada 🇨🇦

September 24, 2021 – Ottawa, ON – Department of Justice Canada

The Department of Justice Canada issued today the following statement:

“Today, counsel for the Department of Justice attended a case management conference regarding the extradition proceedings for Meng Wanzhou. We informed the Court that on September 24 the US Department of Justice withdrew their request for Canada to extradite Meng Wanzhou to the United States. As a result, there is no basis for the extradition proceedings to continue and the Minister of Justice’s delegate has withdrawn the Authority to Proceed, ending the extradition proceedings. The judge released Meng Wanzhou from all of her bail conditions. Meng Wanzhou is free to leave Canada.

Canada is a rule of law country. Meng Wanzhou was afforded a fair process before the courts in accordance with Canadian law. This speaks to the independence of Canada’s judicial system.”

Source » Dept of Justice Canada

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