Curious about Everything

Category: European Union (EU) (Page 1 of 3)

Austria’s €3 per day go-anywhere travel card helps fight climate change

CNN »

Fifteen years after it was first proposed, Austria’s new Klimaticket, or climate ticket, goes live on October 26. Offering seamless travel across all modes of public transport it is intended to galvanize the Alpine nation’s fight against climate change.

The annual pass, priced at USD$1,267 (€1,095), works out at just USD$24 (€21) per week or USD$3.50 a day. If all goes according to plan, it should encourage people to swap their cars for more climate-friendly forms of getting around.

The Austrian government’s 2030 Mobility Master Plan aims to reduce private car use from 70% of total annual kilometers traveled to 54% by 2040, at the same time increasing public transport’s share from 27% to 40% and doubling active travel (walking and cycling) from 3% to 6% of the total.

A passenger on an electric train requires just 55% of the energy used by a battery electric car for the same journey, according to the master plan, meaning big carbon emission cuts can be made with a relatively small percentage shift to more sustainable modes of travel.

More »

Documentary Video » The EU climate deal » Carbon neutral by 2050?

Deutsche Welle via YouTube »

UN climate experts say our future is threatened by rising global temperatures. We are already experiencing more heat waves, forest fires and flooding. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) says it is crucial to take immediate action to reduce greenhouse gases.

The European Union aims to reduce CO2 emissions and become carbon neutral by 2050, using the Green Deal as its road map. The German government has already agreed to more ambitious climate targets. By 2030, it aims to cut carbon emissions by 65 percent compared to 1990 levels. As the EU’s largest industrial nation and its biggest emitter of carbon dioxide, Germany could be a trailblazer for the rest of Europe.

Continue reading

Paris is investing €250 million to become one of the most bike-friendly cities in the world

Paris wants to become one of the most bike-friendly cities in Europe.

Euronews »

As of this year, Paris already has more than 1,000km of safe cycle paths including around 52km of “coronapistes” that were temporarily introduced during the pandemic. It now plans to make these permanent and add another 130km of safe paths to encourage people to cycle in the city.

Paris officials are hoping to make it easier to get across the city on a bike by introducing routes that cross the city and go out into the surrounding suburbs. Places where cyclists are put in danger by crossing busy roads and key entry points into the city centre will also be made more secure.

More »

Turkey summons ambassadors from 10 countries over their call to release activist Osman Kavala

Osman Kavala, 64, has been in Turkish prisons since October 2017. He is being held on charges of espionage and attempting to overthrow the government, stemming from his alleged involvement in the 2013 Gezi protests and the 2016 coup attempt.

Kavala’s imprisonment has been condemned by human rights groups and the European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) has ordered his release.

On Monday, the fourth anniversary of Kavala’s detention, the embassies of the Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, and the United States released a joint statement calling for his immediate release.

“The continuing delays in his trial, including by merging different cases and creating new ones after a previous acquittal, cast a shadow over respect for democracy, the rule of law and transparency in the Turkish judiciary system,” the statement said.

» France 24 / DW / Aljazeera / Euractive

EU Member States have issued more than 591 million EU Digital COVID Certificates

The European Commission published a report on the EU Digital COVID Certificate and its implementation across the EU.

The report shows that the certificate has been a crucial element in Europe’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic, with more than 591 million certificates generated.

The certificate, which covers COVID-19 vaccination, test and recovery, facilitates safe travel for citizens, and it has also been key to support Europe’s hard-hit tourism industry.

It has set a global standard and is currently the only system already in operation at international level.

“The EU Digital COVID Certificate system has helped mitigate negative economic effects during the pandemic. It gave travellers the confidence to travel safely in the EU and boosted travel this summer. Europe has swiftly and successfully set an innovative, privacy-friendly global standard, in times of crisis, with many countries around the globe interested in joining the system,” Commissioner for Justice, Didie Reynders, said.

43 countries across four continents are already connected into the EU Digital COVID Certificate system, and more will follow over the coming weeks and months. Of the 43 countries that are already connected, 27 are EU Member States, 3 European Economic Area (EEA) countries, Switzerland, plus 12 other countries and territories.

Altogether, 60 countries expressed interest in joining the EU system. Beyond the ones already connected, technical discussions are ongoing with 28 of these countries. The EU did not specify which countries those were.

 

Media literacy and how Finland is winning the war on fake news

Eliza Mackintosh, CNN »

The course is part of an anti-fake news initiative launched by Finland’s government in 2014 – two years before Russia meddled in the US elections – aimed at teaching residents, students, journalists and politicians how to counter false information designed to sow division.

The initiative is just one layer of a multi-pronged, cross-sector approach the country is taking to prepare citizens of all ages for the complex digital landscape of today – and tomorrow. The Nordic country, which shares an 832-mile border with Russia, is acutely aware of what’s at stake if it doesn’t.

Finland has faced down Kremlin-backed propaganda campaigns ever since it declared independence from Russia 101 years ago. But in 2014, after Moscow annexed Crimea and backed rebels in eastern Ukraine, it became obvious that the battlefield had shifted: information warfare was moving online.

More »

« Older posts

© 2021 Joe Public

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑