Curious about Everything

Category: COVID-19 (Page 1 of 6)

Over 100 manufacturers that could be making mRNA vaccines have been identified around the world

The global vaccine shortage is prolonging the pandemic for us all.

Singapore is making the unvaccinated pay for their COVID treatments

Singapore is experiencing its worst pandemic wave since the start of the pandemic, reporting around 2000-3000 cases a day. And that’s because it abandoned the “zero-covid” strategy, saying it’s not feasible in a long-term.

To support its new “living with COVID” strategy, Singapore needs to get more people vaccinated and reduce the strain on the healthcare system. Around 90 percent of Singaporeans are fully vaccinated – but that number has to get even higher to reduce the strain on the healthcare system.

About one in five healthcare workers has left medicine since the pandemic started. Why healthcare workers are quitting in droves

It’s not just the US. This is also happening in Canada, Europe, the UK…

Ed Yong / The Atlantic »

Health-care workers, under any circumstances, live in the thick of death, stress, and trauma. “You go in knowing those are the things you’ll see,” Cassandra Werry, an ICU nurse currently working in Idaho, told me. “Not everyone pulls through, but at the end of the day, the point is to get people better. You strive for those wins.” COVID-19 has upset that balance, confronting even experienced people with the worst conditions they have ever faced and turning difficult jobs into unbearable ones.

In the spring of 2020, “I’d walk past an ice truck of dead bodies, and pictures on the wall of cleaning staff and nurses who’d died, into a room with more dead bodies,” Lindsay Fox, a former emergency-medicine doctor from Newark, New Jersey, told me. At the same time, Artec Durham, an ICU nurse from Flagstaff, Arizona, was watching his hospital fill with patients from the Navajo Nation. “Nearly every one of them died, and there was nothing we could do,” he said. “We ran out of body bags.”

Most drugs for COVID-19 are either useless, incrementally beneficial, or—as with the new, promising antivirals—mostly effective in the disease’s early stages. And because people who are hospitalized with COVID-19 tend to be much sicker than average patients, they are also very hard to save—especially when hospitals overflow. Many health-care workers imagined that such traumas were behind them once the vaccines arrived. But plateauing vaccination rates, premature lifts on masking, and the ascendant Delta variant undid those hopes. This summer, many hospitals clogged up again. As patients waited to be admitted into ICUs, they filled emergency rooms, and then waiting rooms and hallways. That unrealized promise of “some sort of normalcy has made the feelings of exhaustion and frustration worse,” Bettencourt told me.

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10 publishers are responsible for 69% of climate change denial content on Facebook

The Guardian »

Ten publishers are responsible for 69% of digital climate change denial content on Facebook, a new study from the Center for Countering Digital Hate (CCDH) has found. The outlets, which the report labels the “toxic ten”, include several conservative websites in the US, as well as Russian state media.

  • Breitbart, a far-right news site once run by former Trump strategist Steve Bannon
  • Western Journal, a Conservative news site
  • Newsmax, which has previously been sued for promoting election fraud conspiracies
  • Townhall Media, founded by the Exxon-funded Heritage Foundation
  • Media Research Center, a “thinktank” that received funding from Exxon
  • Washington Times, founded by self-proclaimed messiah Sun Myung Moon
  • The Federalist Papers, a site that has promoted Covid misinformation
  • Daily Wire, a conservative news site that is of the most engaged-with publishers on Facebook
  • Russian state media, pushing disinformation via RT.com and Sputnik News
  • Patriot Post, a conservative site whose writers use pseudonyms

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America is avoiding questions about living with the COVID-19 long term

Sarah Zhang, The Atlantic »

So if not cases, then what? “We need to come to some sort of agreement as to what it is we’re trying to prevent,” says Céline Gounder, an infectious-disease expert at New York University. “Are we trying to prevent hospitalization? Are we trying to prevent death? Are we trying to prevent transmission?” Different goals would require prioritizing different strategies. The booster-shot rollout has been roiled with confusion for this precise reason: The goal kept shifting. First, the Biden administration floated boosters for everyone to combat breakthroughs, then a CDC advisory panel restricted them to the elderly and immunocompromised most at risk for hospitalizations, then the CDC director overruled the panel to include people with jobs that put them at risk of infection.

On the ground, the U.S. is now running an uncontrolled experiment with every strategy all at once. COVID-19 policies differ wildly by state, county, university, workplace, and school district. And because of polarization, they have also settled into the most illogical pattern possible: The least vaccinated communities have some of the laxest restrictions, while highly vaccinated communities—which is to say those most protected from COVID-19—tend to have some of the most aggressive measures aimed at driving down cases. “We’re sleepwalking into policy because we’re not setting goals,” says Joseph Allen, a Harvard professor of public health. We will never get the risk of COVID-19 down to absolute zero, and we need to define a level of risk we can live with.

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